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advisory on hurrican irene. we want to go to rob marciano who will tell us what this latest advisory is about. >> it's frightening, up to 85-mile-an-hour wind now. there's a possibility from reading some nuggets from the national hurricane center that it could strengthen some more. we knew we had that possibility. still over the gulf stream where waters are still warm enough to sustain a hurricane. also getting into an environment where it favored strengthening. that's what we've seen. here it is in the satellite picture. 85-mile-an-hour winds. that's a moderate strength category one storm with possible strengthening as we go through time. about 380 miles south of new york city it's movement has picked up northerly about 15 miles an hour and we still expect that turn toward the west later on. this is huge. reading some technical stuff, the tropical storm force winds, diameter nearly 800 miles wide. that is huge. the second largest tropical system we've seen in the last few decades. hurricane force winds extend 150 miles out. the amount of damaging winds is about 350 to 400 m
irene which do cause some minor flooding in this area. they're concerned this could cause major flooding. there was a study out of columbia university that said had hurricane irene been one foot worse it could have caused an additional $50 billion in damage. the fear here is that if the water comes up over this seawall, which is right here next to me, it could flood the subway tunnels, even the electrical grid here. mayor michael bloomberg said he's considering shutting down two electrical networks in lower manhattan. that would shut down power to some 17,000 people but it could quickly get much, much higher than that. as the day continues we're expecting this storm surge to grow. high tide is about 8:50 tonight. there's a full moon so it's an even higher tide than usual. if that storm surge of six to eleven feet hits right at that bad moment, that is what concerns them most, soledad. >> of course, john, it's cold! usually when we cover these hurricanes it's much warmer. but if they lose power, as many people are predicting, 10 million people up along the east coast could lose power, you
the street. a lot of people after hurricane irene said they decided to stay put. what you see in the distance is a new york city bus that has been converted into a hurricane shelter transport. there's 72 hurricane shelters set up throughout new york city. so far at last check, there were only about 1,100 people staying inside of them. mandatory evacuations were in place for hurricane irene but that storm petered out. this, of course, expected to be much worse. so many people buying generators, water, extra food, deciding to stick it out. the problem with all of that is in the past four hours that we've been here, conditions have deteriorated quickly. so when people notice that something could really be wrong, they may not have a chance to get out safely. veronica. >> you can hear the wind picking up. tracie strahan of wnbc, thank you. >>> moments ago president obama canceled a campaign appearance in florida in order to get back to the white house sooner to monitor the storm. nbc's tracie potts has the latest for us from washington. tracie, what's going on? >> reporter: veronica, as you can se
here, the effects of sandy, are already worse than what we saw with irene. >> absolutely. absolutely. >> now, you see you have packed up the dog. you were under a mandatory evacuation, but you did decide to wait until this moment. did you think that there was a time you could actually ride it out? >> yeah. >> we did until the winds really started picking up. the tide wasn't going out at all, and it was well past high tide. >> i think a lot of public officials are going to be glad that you are heeding the warning and deciding to get out. i'm going to let you get on with your boat. thank you very much for waiting. suzanne, i also want you to take a look down the street here. the guy that you see in the scuba gear, his name is paul. he is a lifeguard. paul, come on over here and talk to me here for a moment. take off the goggles and what not. i know you have been down here in the neighborhood. you've been monitoring things. obviously, you're dressed appropriately for the occasion, but i know a lot of public officials want folks like you to head on out. >> um, yes. however, i'm real clos
surge if it is as forecast, which will be worse than hurricane irene last year, could create some serious problems in terms of getting in to the subway system, in terms of getting into the con ed steam lines and potentially the electrical system. and so even if the wind doesn't blow out power, there could be pry empty differen preemptive power outages. so that's one of the many reasons that they decided to hunger down with all the financial markets. stay home, there's money to be made later and we'll just deal with it. for now just a little bit of a breeze blowing here. that is clearly supposed to chan change. >> where do you go later? >> you have to find a pole, right? you know that that's -- every guy out in a strong breeze, you've seen -- you've got to find a pole around there, right? >> i'll look for it. there's light poles and stuff, but i think i need to get a little further away from the water. >> yeah, that would be a good idea, too. >> we'll have to get him a bungee cord. okay. let's get a little bit more on the forecast on the storm in maria larosa. >> as you mentioned,
. a lot of people said they were not going to ride it out like they did irene. it's hard to say. you can see some of the windows in some of these high rises where there is power to them, generator power or what have you, but obviously it's very dark down here in lower manhattan with the power that's been shut off on purpose in many areas and that's the con edison said that they are doing that so they can easily -- more easily restore power once this storm goes through. but they've got a lot on their hands tonight, as we mentioned, with that explosion on one of the transformers on the other side. >> ida single, thank you so much. if we can go back to that video that we were just looking at, for people that have not seen the coverage throughout the evening, this is a picture of a crane atop a luxury high rise in midtown manhattan. it has been dangling precariously, dangerously off the top of that building which has become known in manhattan as the global billionaire's club because the nine full floors at the top have been sold to billionaires. two of the dupe pleks are $90 million each. yo
mean, twhapd during irene? >> caller: well, i have to tell you, i was here personally, the same way. and probably, it was exactly the same scenario. i think most people are heeding the warning and are staying home and staying put. and that's allowing them to stay safe and not, you know, causing the unnecessary injury or illness from occurring. >> yeah. similarity. so, so far, so good, right? >> caller: so far, so good. we are keeping our fingers crossed. like i said, we have extra staff on board tonight. everybody's bunking out at the hospital. we are waiting to see, you know, if we are needed. >> doctor, this is heather, i did want to ask you a question. i know you don't want to talk specifically about the situation right now at the new york medical center where they are evacuating people. but what happens when have you patients who are on ventilators? they have at least four infants on ventilator there is. they are having to evacuate them and take them out of the hospital, carry patients down the stairwells. how do do you that? >> caller: well, very carefully, obviously. but what
than irene's 15.8 billion, last year. but far below katrina's 108-billion dollars and 18-hundred deaths and missing in 2005. unless there is damage to infrastructure, economists say ports and rail yards will make up for lost business quickly. some stock trades, perhaps not--because a light week was expected pending the outcome of the presidential race, a week from now. among insurers, allstate, travelers and chubb corp have the largest market share in sandy's path. corelogic, estimates it includes 284,000 homes worth $88-billion dollars. economists are mixed on whether the storm's impact will affect fourth- quarter g-d-p. mark vitner, senior economist with wells fargo securities says it depends how much is shut down and for how long. mark zandi at moody's analytics says the storm may cause spikes in economic activity--repairing and rebuilding. depsite the storm-- the government is expected to report unemployment numbers for october this friday. phone companies along the east coast are preparing for the likelihood of overtaxed communication infrastructure during hurricane sandy. at&t is
every community is at least 75% or more out at this hour and as we saw with irene and then with the october snowstorm, it can take a long time, perhaps a week or even nine or ten days before the power gets restored for a lot of these folks. >> and that is the latest from old saybrook, connecticutment we want to go back to cape may, new jersey. we told you this is a continually developing story and more weather effects being felt although the worst is over. jay gray is there and i understand it started raining again. >> reporter: yeah, chris, we have seen a little more rain dropping in which is exactly what they don't need in this small community. there's already been some flooding problems. that's going to continue obviously as the advance of rain moves through and really it's slowing down the effort to get out and assess the situation. we're also really seeing intense winds that continue to whip around this area. there is some damage to buildings in the city. there's some damage to the infrastructure here. but, again, we can't get to exactly how much damage becaus
with these types of storms. we had your cain irene last year with over a million customers without power. rachel came through this summer knocked out the same amount without power. we've been through this before. our local officials have been through this before. they're well-trained. they have good plans how to respond to this. we've been communicating and people are taking steps to be prepared. so we feel fairly confident in virginia folks are taking the steps to be ready for whatever the storm might bring. jon: i know you have got the national guard out and ready did. you've got power crews coming in from other states to help restore power as well, don't you?. >> yeah. we know many of our power companies in virginia are prepositioning out-of-state resources coming in. national guard we deployed them in key areas around the commonwealth to be ready to deploy and help out local officials that might need assistance. we have our state police and out there. department of transportation. they have their crews across the commonwealth. they're already to go to help out as needed. jon: from virginia's
hurricane irene, we achieved a 98% evacuation rate. but for whatever reason, this time, we haven't reached that number yet. we think we're somewhere having evacuated several thousand people. but we still have too many people in atlantic city. that creates a very uncomfortable situation for all of our emergency responders and officials are still trying to do the best we can to get people out of harm's way. >> mayor, ali velshi is on the streets of atlantic city. right now, the winds are obviously very gusty. ali, you have a question you'd like to ask the mayor. >> reporter: yes, i do, mayor. and the important thing is by looking at atlantic city, people can look at this and say, this might happen in my community. if you're still not evacuated, what do you do? i know people are driving around. they can get out in their car but it's gusty and dangerous. should people leave and go to a shelter now or hunker down and stay? >> at this point, i think they would be best served to stay at home and hunker down. i just visited a couple of our shelters. i had a very difficult time getting back to wher
of that was west of the coast, at least where i was we didn't get the rain we got with irene, not even close. >> right, we were most concerned about the flooding because of the tidal action. right there, yeah, the surge, we have wonderful beaches and between dewey beach and bethany beach we had to close route 1. there are a lot of others we had to close throughout the state. the bay communities were hit hard but we've got people out looking right now. we think we escaped the worst of it. >> and total cost for delaware, any idea yet in. >> we don't know. we have people as we say looking right now, i think it will take us a little while to figure that out. certainly concerned about the 44,000 families without power but we're obviously looking forward to utility crews getting out there as soon as, once conditions permit them to be out there. they can't be in harm's way if the winds are too high. >> for your state was this not as significant or not as negative of an outcome as irene, governor? >> well, i mean i'd put it this way we have a lot of flooding and we do have 40,000 plus people without
. and we went through hurricane irene, tropical storm irene last year, this time last year. but this is a lot worse as far as storm surge down here. again, right now we also know that 400,000 people about are without power here in connecticut. very dire situation. the governor briefing the media in just a little while up in hartford. that's the latest down here in new haven, connecticut. back to you. >> thank you. it's always deadly to underestimate the power of one of those storms. let's turn things over to meteorologist rob mayeda. we're anticipating that bad weather is going to move into that area soon. >> it is approaching from the south. right now, certainly delaware, new jersey and new york seeing the worst of the former hurricane, now just a supercharged nor'easter that is crossing the coast. winds sustained at 80 miles per hour. we have seen gusts closer to 90 miles an hour on long island. everything in purple would be wind gusts at about hurricane strength. that's a large area being impacted there. as that wall of water being pushed by the winds, over the last 24 t
% or more out at this hour. and as we saw with irene then again with the october snowstorm, it can take a long time, perhaps a week or even nine or ten days before the power gets restored for a lot of folks. >> jeff stecker from wvit. thank you for that update. to the point he was making that it's so dark outside, there's so much water out there, there are so many downed lines. take this advice. this came from the fairfield police chief. "we have limited responsibilities, please stay inside your house and we are expecting massive damage." and i think that that would apply to communities up and down the eastern seaboard. we will continue msnbc's live coverage of hurricane sandy right after this. [ ryan ] it doesn't get any better than endless shrimp at red lobster. you can mix and match all day! [ male announcer ] don't miss red lobster's endless shrimp, just $14.99! try as much as you like, any way you like! like parmesan crusted shrimp. hurry in, offer ends soon! i'm ryan isabell and i see food differently. hurry in, offer ends soon! wooohooo....hahaahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo
in years. that sounds very dramatic, but it isn't so when you think about what irene did to connecticut last year. irene, many people in new york and new jersey rolled their eyes at it and said it wasn't a very big deal. here in connecticut it was a very big deal. here in fairfield there were houses with not just broken windows, houses knocked off foundation and thrown into the water. they expect this to be even worse, the storm surge to be even worse here than it was during irene. so that's the major concern. there's the mandatory evacuations up and down the connecticut coast. the good news is that most people are heeding those evacuation orders. the other big concern is power outages. all the wind they are expecting to get up here, because the wind is going to be very strong up on the northern edge of this storm. the wind will cause a lot of power outages along with that flooding. they expect -- connecticut light and power expect as many as 600,000 people to be without power here in connecticut for days on end. during irene they were without power for days on end as well so everybody
's hurricane irene forced him to rebuild. >> you have to prepare. >> from virginia to new england, several governors declared emergencies and issued warnings. assume there will be a long period of time in which you are without energy. >> in connecticut, workers cleared streets of debris and in massachusetts homeowners pulled batteries, flashlights and emergency supplies off the shelves. voters took their prized safety.ons to >> today i'm protecting my interests and battening down the hatches. >> in new jersey, one boat yard couldn't keep up with requests. >> we are not able to take the boats out of the water. >> navy ships in virginia are taking precautions, too, heading out to sea heed ahead of the storm. along the coast, homeowners gathered sand bags. flooding is a concern as a high tide pairs with sandy's surge. everybody is pitching in to get prepared. >> you can track tropical storm sandy's movements on our interactive radar. see satellite images and follow storm updates on live wire and see how to prepare for power outages. that's all on our website, wbaltv.com, and on our mobile app
for a very long time because of a storm and it was just last year with hurricane irene that brought a lot of power outages for a very lengthy time to the state of connecticut. >> that's right, i would contrast this storm from the deratio we experienced this summer, where it same upon us all at once, we didn't have the time to stage our crews. this time we have several days warning, we're staging our crews, but again, this is going to be a very, very severe storm. mr. owens, meteorologist chad myers has a question for you. >> this is going to be one of those big storms, it's going to be windy for a long time and people are going to lose power at the beginning and are going to be very impatient in the beginning, and you won't put crews out there until what purpose? you're obviously not going to put men in bucks at 60? >> yes, we'll wait until the wind dies down. so obviously, we're only going to have those crews seek to restore service. you first have to assess the damage and we believe that there will be substantial physical destruction of our infrastructure, we're going to have to assess
is on script. and that is that this afternoon's tide will be as bad as the perfect storm '92/irene of last year. and that tonight's tide, along with the entirety of long island sound on our side, could be catastrophic. that's what we're planning for. we hope it's avoided somehow and some way, but if you look at all the surge maps, it's connecticut that will be most adversely impacted. >> yeah. and you know what? i covered connecticut for quite some time many years ago. and there are neighborhoods on the coastline that get flooded during a thunderstorm. >> yeah. >> how are you going to keep homes from getting decimated up and down the connecticut coastline if. >> listen, we've ordered evacuations or suggested ev evacuations that affect 362,000 people, one out of every ten residents of the state of connecticut. but it's the small towns and it's the big cities. it's new haven, bridge fort, stamford, norwalk, fairfield, they're all going to be adversely impacted. we're waiting to see. if this hits 11 feet with waves on top of 11 feet, we're talking about dike systems being overrun. that's the sever
during hurricane irene, so they knew what to do. they knew exactly when to leave. they got there immediately once they were advised to leave. so we're really proud of these folks in the shelter and, you know, they just seem to be having a good time. they are in a safe place. they've got warm meals and they've got the support of the american red cross to get them through these hard times, because when they go home, they don't know what they're going to expect. they could go home to severe flooding and severe damage to their homes so having that safety net right now is so important. >> well, besides the shelters which obviously are critically important and could continue to be so because as you say of flooding and we're hearing that some of these power outages could be long term, what are the priorities of the services that the red cross will provide in the next couple of days? >> yes, we've already gone ahead and told them and pre-positioned over 100 emergency response vehicles and thousands of relief supplies, cots, blanket, food and deployed odd thousand of volunteers so o
and down the shore. >> it is just like nothing i have ever seen before. you know, we had irene. last year we had a nor'easter in '92. i remember as a kid hurricane donna but nothing like this. there are so many people stranded without shelter. and the damage to the public infrastructure, to the boardwalks, municipal buildings, firehouses it is just endless. bill: frank pallone, thank you. we're going to stay in touch with you and a lot of others down there and hopefully get the word out. if we can help in any way making the word more public we certainly will, sir. thank you and good luck to you and your family. >> thank you. bill: frank pallone, democrat on the jersey shore. waking up to a whole new world as so many people are. >> sandy's wrath is extending into west virgina. have you seen the snow that got dumped on west virgina. look at this scene. blizzard conditions there. up to three feet of snow in some parts of the state. we're live there on the ground now. we're going to tell you what is going on. bill: while we continue to deal with that storm damage we can not forget this. you'r
're talking about experience with these bad storms. hurricane irene hit this place last year and the people here had the experience of this kind of flooding, but not as rapid as what we've been seeing. we have been in a constant -- [ no audio ] >> we lost david mattingly, obviously, technically, as you can imagine it is very difficult to maintain contact. that's why i'm talking on the phone. we literally got knocked off the air a short time ago. let's bring in chad myers, who is monitoring events in the severe weather center. what are we looking at in terms of timeline now for folks who are watching this and trying to figure out how long they're going to have been staying in their homes, how long this is going to last? when is the water going to peak, when will we start to see some of this water receding and how long is this thing going to be lasting for? >> i don't think we'll see the water recede enough through the low tide that we won't have another high tide on top of what we're seeing now in some spots. we could continue this flooding for another two tide cycles so at least another alm
worse than when i stood here 14 months ago for hurricane irene. i would say that broadway which runs the entire length of new york city parallel with the ocean is under something like 5 feet. every single home is impossible to imagine how all of them aren't completely inundated on the ground level. the water goes back street after street after street as far as we can see. we cannot get out of this hotel right now to explore further. but it is a desperate situation for anybody who did not heed those warnings, which were said again and again by officials. get off of what is a barrier island. get out while you can. now it is way way too late. we wait for day break to see when this surge ends. and also the extent of the damage it has done. it is going to be bad here in long beach city and across the length of long island, shep. you and i have covered a the love hurricanes and we have seen a lot of storms. can i tell you i have never seen a storm surge like this, shep. >> shepard: jonathan hunt live on long island in new york. so, it's becoming clear what we are witnessing from virginia b
power right now. there was criticism after last year's hurricane irene. remember that? but the governor said utility and power companies will be working together to be more efficient. you see this video of that boathouse that succumbed to the winds and water of sandy. schools in boston were closed. and all public transportation was suspended today. >>> and the streets are flooded, and in a lot of places the water is still rising. >> yeah. new jersey, for instance. only one of the areas that is still getting pounded. new reports, new details, all straight ahead as we take you through the night. early morning hours. ♪... ♪... choose the perfect hotel >>> these are pictures out of ocean city. ocean city, maryland or new jersey? all right. ocean city, new jersey here. you can see the storm surge that's moved in anywhere between five feet and twelve feet in some parts along the jersey-new york coast. that's where we saw roughly 12 hours ago. pretty remarkable images there. right now, however, that superstorm sandy moving further inland. it's leaving behind all the flooding in the northea
this. we got banged up very badly a year ago with irene. much worse than other states. six weeks later, we had a winter storm that wiped us out. we had 1.1 customers without power in our state. tonight we have over 600,000 people without power. some of our towns were affected by all three of those events and some towns had 97% people without power each and every time in the last year. we're getting used to this right now. we're actually becoming experts at it. >> in terms of the frequency of extreme weather, we have seen governor cuomo talking about that as the new normal. climate change is such a politicized things, but if we're seeing frequent instances of things that are not supposed to happen but once in a century, what do you have to do differently in terms of infrastructure you wouldn't have to do if you weren't facing these events? >> number one, i have been talking about climate change since 1997. it's happened. it's alive and well in connecticut. number two, we have to raise a lot of infrastructure. literally lift it up off the ground. and we have to think of our cities very d
've been through this. we got banged up very badly a year ago with irene much worse than other states. six weeks later we had a winter storm that wiped us out. we had 1.1 million people in our little -- our customers in our little state without power. tonight we have over 600,000 people without power. some of our towns were affected by all three of those events and some of those towns are 97% of people without power. we're getting used to it and becoming experts at it. >> in terms of the frequency of extreme we've seen governor cuomo talking about it as planning on it to be the new normal. climate change is so politicized but if we are seeing frequent things of things that aren't supposed to happen what are you to do differently that you wouldn't have to do if you weren't facing these frequent and continuing events. >> i've been talking about climbed change since 1997. it's happened. it's alive and well in connecticut. number two, we have to raise a lot of infrastructure, that is literally lift it up off the ground and we have to think of our cities very differently than we thought about t
of packing long johns and ear mu muffs. it is freezing out here. i want you to take a look. irene was easy. bring on sandy. minimal damage on rehoboth avenue and even along the boardwalk. you're seeing some debris, sandbags here. honestly, this town, this city was expecting a whole lot worse. i think a lot of people were. a lot of people waking up this morning very, very thankful for the things that have gone on in the course of the last 24 hours, at least here for us locally. new york, new jersey, a very different story. more than eight inches of rain here in rehoboth. more than 6,000 power outages and still a driving ban in effect. but this morning, again, with that driving ban, businesses as well are not going to be open until after the 4:30 hour. still a very cold, very light drizzly morning here in rehoboth. how are you holding up? >> we're fine. especially compared to you. you guys have been working overtime in in rehoboth. thakds to you guys on team rehoboth. we'll see you in a bit. >>> the wind may be dying down, but hundreds of thousands of people in our area still in the dark. mo
here during hurricane irene. hurricane sandy is coming on strong. here's what he had to say yesterday around 4:00 in the afternoon. take a listen. >> i haven't seen a whole lot worse than this and the storm is already hundreds of miles -- it's still hundreds of miles away. so what it will be when it actually hits is very concerning. that's why we're asking people to treat this really seriously. >> reporter: it looks like a lot of people out here in rehoboth beach are taking this seriously, although we still have seen a lot of folks out here deciding to ride out the storm. you are seeing the 14-foot, 15- foot tall waves crashing into the rehoboth beach boardwalk. all the businesses right along the beach have all boarded up. they are all closed down and they're going to stay this way for several more days. lots of sandbags, lots of boarded up, taped windows. really a ghost town over there. you can see the waves just creeping closer and closer to the shore. we are still three hours away from high tide. farther down in ocean city, i believe their boardwalk is still standing. social media
. >> it is handed down through generations to generations. and what happened here really was when irene came last time, everybody left and a lot of people have houses, they got devastated. i think people felt this time, just wait here and see what happens. whether you're here or not, this is tremendous. to rebuild this will be a mammoth -- i don't know how they'll go about starting it. this is really tragic. >> reporter: this area, everybody is assessing the damage, but take a look, look at this car, the rubber of the tires completely burned off. the interior reduced to smithere smithereens, people did not move their cars out and as a result, they simply caught fire. homes that are nearby that didn't actually get the full impact of the fire, the siding melted off from the sheer heat. you can see some firefighters here, again, they have been here around the clock, through the night this is a dmcommunity whe you have firefighters, retired police officers, folks from the coast guard, all know each other, all grow up here and they're assessing the damage. the smell is so pungent, anderson, of the fir
storms recently, like hurricane irene last year and you run the into sentiments like this. irene was easy, bring on sandy. and forget the reign and tidal surge for a moment, it is know that is already hitting west virginia. blizzard conditions expected. and as far west as chicago, emergency planners are bracing for their own challenges. >> lake winds are going to be 50 to 60 miles an hour. waves could exceed the 24-foot mark. >> now, people may start returning home in some of these areas. as early as today. but there is still a long cleanup ahead. in rehobeth beach, delaware, doug luzader, fox news. >>> after the break, dave roth takes a look at how the aftermath of sandy is playing out on the web. >> but first, a reminder that refrigerated food can spoil quickly during a power outage. keep items in the fridge as cool as possible the cdc suggests packing together dairy items, meat, fish and eggs in a cooler with ice and use a food thermometer to check food in a dark refrigerator and anything more than 40 degrees fahrenheit should be tossed. for the freezer section, a half full freezer wil
outages. they had hundreds of thousands of people without power during irene last year. they expect the same this year, probably even worse. they are thinking maybe as many as 600,000 without power for days to come. again the surge is really going to be problem here. we'll see that later in the evening and into tomorrow. matt? >> we spoke to connecticut's governor daniel malloy earlier this morning. he said this storm is one of the biggest threats to human life in his state in years. i began by asking governor malloy what worries him specifically about sandy. >> it's the next two tides. could experience tides this afternoon at about what the perfect storm was. tonight's tide during the nighttime hours could be twice that, and that's our biggest worry. if that happens it really is catastrophic. the amount of damage and loss of property is going to be extreme. we've been talking about it for days. we've prepared. we have people trying places. we have equipment in the right places. really we're waiting to see what mother nature throws at us. let's be clear. this storm is staying on scr
on a regular basis. cheryl: irene was 5,000,000,006,000,000,000? ashley: no matter what work is given to recover, it will be more than offset by the business lost. gerri: i think we will have a lot of spending. keep in mind where that money will come from. it is just one big circle. one big cycle. more people will be working. they will be working to fix roads, bridges, homes, but it is our taxpayer dollars. ashley: gerri willis, thank you very much. don't miss "the willis report" tonight. cheryl: we are getting more breaking news. con ed announces they are aiming to restore power to lower manhattan. that should be by friday or saturday. power is basically out everywhere. they are hoping to get it completely restored by friday and saturday. this is issues with regards to manhattan. ashley: if they can get it back by thursday, that would be impressive no doubt. the twilight saga will continue. cheryl: as we do every day at this time, let's take a look at the ten and 30 year treasuries. we will be right back. ♪ ♪ >> i have here fox business brief. the markets drifted into negative te
of practice with stuff like this, whether it's irene a week ago, isaac, months ago and we're mobilizing blood, making sure the blood supply needs to be in the key areas of the country. >> rick: the last minute preparations, there isn't a lot of time left. any last minute thing you can suggest to people that they do? >> the most important thing right now in the last minute if there's little time to get out and make sure you've got the food and water you need in terms of your kit, is to have a battery operated radio, something that can give you the ability to listen to any evacuation orders or any emergency notices that may be going out. >> rick: all right, charles one last thing-- >> mention that the red cross has-- >> that's exactly where i was going to lead you i saw the phone in your hand and talk about an app? >> i am going to talk about a hurricane app. the red cross has a hurricane app that's available for apple and android, folks can download it, it's got a tremendous "i'm safe" feature that allows people with a one push of a button let friends and family know they're safe and an import
in that state. that is twice the number that were without power after hurricane irene. so a serious situation in the state of new jersey. savannah. >> all right. >>> from new jersey to connecticut, the governor there is calling the storm the worst water event in his state's history. thousands of homeowners trapped by coastal flooding. nbc's katie in connecticut this morning. katie, good morning to you. >> reporter: certainly one of the worst water events in history. now it's going to go down as one of the worse power events. take a look at what's going on here in stonington. this tree is about 80 feet tall. i'm about 5'2", 5'3". ripped out from its roots about 5:00 last night, and thrown on to, luckily, the powerlines here, which are basically cradling this tree right now. this house was saved by those power lineses. you are seeing this seen up and down connecticut as we speak. trees that are down, taking down power lines, and damaging a number of houses. that's what is causing a lot of the outages. there was massive flooding as well last night. high tide here in stonington was around 9:30 la
? >> okay. last time irene, right now, 7 billion initial estimate, totally wrong. it ultimately was 15 billion. there's about 20 billion that came into the economy from federal payment and from insurance. katrina, $100 billion, again, took a long time to rebuild what. i would say is the initial impact is very, very bad, but when the federal government gets involved, waves its wand, and when the insurers pay, you tend to have a very quick rebound that can actually help, if it's huge enough, the gross domestic product of the united states. >> i want toé@ focus in on tha not to be intencenssensitive to people are dealing with, but there are serb sectors of the economy that will benefit. i would assume the construction industry, to start with one. >> yes. hurricane andrew in 1992, the construction industry boomed. the lumber industry boomed. glass. a lot of companies simply had to send everything down to florida, and that raised the praise across the board throughout the united states. highly unusual. that was pretty much the only time that i've seen the gross national product really jum
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